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zip.png After Getting the Smallpox Vaccine HOT

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The smallpox vaccine contains a live virus called vaccinia. After vaccination, this live virus is present at the vaccine site and can be spread to other parts of the body or to other individuals through contact. To avoid this, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully until the scab that forms after vaccination falls off on its own (in 2 to 3 weeks).



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:27
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zip.png What to Know Before Getting the Smallpox Vaccine HOT

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The smallpox vaccine is made from a living virus called “vaccinia.” Vaccinia virus is like smallpox virus, but less harmful. The vaccine does not contain the smallpox virus. It can not give you smallpox. The vaccine can protect people from smallpox. For most people, the smallpox vaccine works and is safe. But, people with certain health conditions are more likely to have serious reactions to the smallpox vaccine. These people should not be vaccinated and they should not be in close contact with someone who has been vaccinated.



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:30
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zip.png Smallpox Overview HOT

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Smallpox is a serious, contagious, and sometimes fatal infectious disease. There is no specific treatment for smallpox disease, and the only prevention is vaccination. The name smallpox is derived from the Latin word for “spotted” and refers to the raised bumps that appear on the face and body of an infected person.



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:31
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zip.png Frequently Asked Questions About Smallpox HOT

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Smallpox is an acute, contagious, and sometimes fatal disease caused by the variola virus (an
orthopoxvirus), and marked by fever and a distinctive progressive skin rash. In 1980, the disease was declared eradicated following worldwide vaccination programs. However, in the aftermath of the events of September and October, 2001, the U.S. government is taking precautions to be ready to deal with a bioterrorist attack using smallpox as a weapon. As a result of these efforts: 1) There is a detailed nationwide smallpox preparedness program to protect Americans against smallpox as a biological weapon. This program includes the creation of preparedness teams that are ready to respond to a smallpox attack on the United States. Members of these teams – health care and public health workers - are being vaccinated so that they might safely protect others in the event of a smallpox outbreak. 2) There is enough smallpox vaccine to vaccinate everyone who would need it in the event of an emergency.



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:33
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zip.png Smallpox Form for Health Dept HOT

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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:34
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zip.png SMALLPOX VACCINE AND HEART PROBLEMS HOT

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Careful monitoring of smallpox vaccinations given over recent months has suggested that the
vaccine may cause heart inflammation (myocarditis), inflammation of the membrane covering
the heart (pericarditis), and/or a combination of these two problems (myopericarditis). Experts
are exploring this more in depth.



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:35
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zip.png Smallpox Vaccine and Weak Immune Systems HOT

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The smallpox vaccine is made from a live virus related to smallpox called vaccinia (not smallpox virus). The vaccine stimulates the immune system to react against the vaccinia virus, and develop immunity to it. Immunity to vaccinia also provides immunity to smallpox. For most people, live virus vaccines are safe and effective. However, people with immune system problems usually are advised to avoid live virus vaccines because their immune systems may not be able to stop the growth of the virus in their bodies. In the case of the smallpox vaccine, while the risk for severe complications for someone with a weakened immune system is unknown, there have been cases of serious reactions to the vaccine. Someone with a weakened immune system might develop a widespread, severe, vaccinia rash (generalized vaccinia), or ongoing severe skin destruction at the vaccination site (progressive vaccinia/vaccinia necrosum).



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:36
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zip.png Who Should Not Get the Smallpox Vaccine? HOT

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Some people are at greater risk for serious side effects from the smallpox vaccine. Individuals who have any of the following conditions, or live with someone who does, should NOT get the
smallpox vaccine unless they have been exposed to the smallpox virus.



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:38
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zip.png What You Should Know About a Smallpox Outbreak HOT

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The thought of a smallpox outbreak is scary, but public health officials are preparing to
respond quickly and effectively to such an event. The public can prepare too, by being informed. This fact sheet was created to provide members of the public with basic information about the possible use of smallpox as a biological weapon and what to do if that happens. If a smallpox emergency occurs, more detailed information and instructions will be available on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) web site and through other channels such as radio and television.



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:39
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zip.png Smallpox Vaccination Information for Women Who Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding HOT

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Should pregnant women receive the smallpox vaccine?

No. Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant within 4 weeks after vaccination should NOT get the smallpox vaccine. In addition, anyone who has a close contact who is pregnant should not get the vaccine (close contacts include anyone living in your household and anyone you have close, physical contact with such as a sex partner or someone you share a bed with).



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Friday, 19 February 2016 15:40
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